Principles of Trap, Neuter and Return Certificate Level 3

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QEL Code: 806

QEL Code806
CPD15
Estimated Study Time15 hours
Start DateAnytime
Study modeOnline
Award typeCertificate
Assessment MethodShort answer questions to confirm your knowledge

Course Accreditation

Quality Endorsed by:

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Course fees £149

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Unit 1

Principles and benefits of TNR

This unit examines the concept of Trap Neuter Return (TNR) and investigates the principles of how this works. Learn how to gain community assistance and create general awareness through effective communication when setting up a TNR project.

Unit 2

Humane trapping techniques & equipment required

Learn about the principles of humanely and safely trapping companion animals and the relevant equipment required. This unit also explores neutering, vaccinations, treatment for injury or illness, testing for FeLV and FIV, euthanasia of animals whose suffering cannot be alleviated, ear tipping, return of animals. This concludes with how to effectively monitor and evaluate the results.

Principles of Trap, Neuter and Return

The Trap Neuter Return Course (TNR) has been designed to provide the essential knowledge required for effectively carrying out this valuable animal welfare work.

TNR has been proven to be a humane and cost effective way of controlling and stabilising feral cat and dog populations around the world.

Using this technique, all the cats or dogs in a colony are trapped, neutered and then returned to their territory where caretakers provide them with food and shelter.

What is Trap, Neuter and Return

Trap, Neuter and Return (TNR) are the processes in which feral dog and cat colonies are managed throughout the world.

TNR has been proven to be a humane and cost effective way of controlling and stabilising feral cat and dog populations around the world.
Using this technique, all the cats or dogs in a colony are trapped, neutered and then returned to their territory where caretakers provide them with food and shelter.

The TNR method has been practised for over 70 years, but it is not known exactly who pioneered the process. TNR refers to dogs and cats that are feral. Essentially by definition referring to companion pets free roaming and unowned.

These populations of feral dogs and cats are more susceptible to illness, disease and shortened – life expectancy. Because of their high mortality rate, it is natural for these dogs and cats to fill the void by reproducing. Feral dogs can breed up to two litters a year, often resulting in up to 10 puppies. Feral cats can reproduce up to two litters also, resulting in up to six kittens a year. These numbers may seem low, however, the numbers can soon add up, resulting in more and more dogs and cats struggling to survive.